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Brother Calculus

A palatable blog of Mathematical Science for the 21st century.
Feb 22 '11
Feb 22 '11
BROTHER CALCULUS, WHAT IS DIFFERENTIATION?
Differentiation is the method of measuring the rate of change of something.
WHAT THE FUCK DOES THAT MEAN?
Say if you run between two points, a and b, and you know how long it takes, you can get velocity.
We’d say you differentiate x (displacement) with respect to t (time). This is most commonly written as dx/dt.
WHERE THE FUCK DID THE d’s COME FROM?
d is just an Anglicised form of the greek letter delta ( Δ ), which, in this case, means difference.
WHAT?
dx means difference in x, which is b-a in this example. dt is finish time minus starting time.
WHAT IF I WANT TO GET ACCELERATION?
Then you differentiate again with respect to time: d/dt(dx/dt) = d^2x/dt^2
JESUS CHRIST.
No problem, squire.

If you have a maths problem, complex or simple, email brother.calculus@gmail.com

BROTHER CALCULUS, WHAT IS DIFFERENTIATION?

Differentiation is the method of measuring the rate of change of something.

WHAT THE FUCK DOES THAT MEAN?

Say if you run between two points, a and b, and you know how long it takes, you can get velocity.

We’d say you differentiate x (displacement) with respect to t (time). This is most commonly written as dx/dt.

WHERE THE FUCK DID THE d’s COME FROM?

d is just an Anglicised form of the greek letter delta ( Δ ), which, in this case, means difference.

WHAT?

dx means difference in x, which is b-a in this example. dt is finish time minus starting time.

WHAT IF I WANT TO GET ACCELERATION?

Then you differentiate again with respect to time: d/dt(dx/dt) = d^2x/dt^2

JESUS CHRIST.

No problem, squire.

If you have a maths problem, complex or simple, email brother.calculus@gmail.com

Feb 2 '11
Napoleon Bonaparte: “Thank you, Professor Laplace, for your book on Celestial Mechanics. Though my scientists inform me that, despite its title, there is no mention of God amongst its pages. Why is that?”

Pierre Simon Laplace: “I had no need of that hypothesis.” 

Napoleon Bonaparte: “Thank you, Professor Laplace, for your book on Celestial Mechanics. Though my scientists inform me that, despite its title, there is no mention of God amongst its pages. Why is that?”

Pierre Simon Laplace: “I had no need of that hypothesis.” 

Oct 1 '10

(Source: daisystpatience)